Original Research

Knowledge and affective traits of physiotherapy students to provide care for patients living with AIDS.

Oyeyemi Y. Adetoyeje, Oyeyemi L. Adewale, Akinwale G. Saliu, Aderibigbe I. Olubamike, Alba G. Olufunke, U. Anjorin Olayiwola
South African Journal of Physiotherapy | Vol 66, No 3 | a69 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v66i3.69 | © 2010 Oyeyemi Y. Adetoyeje, Oyeyemi L. Adewale, Akinwale G. Saliu, Aderibigbe I. Olubamike, Alba G. Olufunke, U. Anjorin Olayiwola | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 06 January 2010 | Published: 19 February 2010

About the author(s)

Oyeyemi Y. Adetoyeje, Hunter College, City University of New York, New York, U.S.A., United States
Oyeyemi L. Adewale, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria, Nigeria
Akinwale G. Saliu, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, Nigeria
Aderibigbe I. Olubamike, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, Nigeria
Alba G. Olufunke, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, Nigeria
U. Anjorin Olayiwola, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria, Nigeria

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Abstract

Purpose: This  study  aimed  to  assess  Nigerian physiotherapy students’ knowledge and their affective traits in caring for patients living with AIDS (PWA).Methods: Nigerian students (N=104) in four training programs were surveyed using a 43-item questionnaire that elicited information on the  students’  demographics  characteristics,  knowledge  levels  on AIDS transmission, universal precaution and pathophysiology, their feeling  of  preparedness,  comfort,  ethical  disposition  for  PWA  and their  willingness  to  evaluate  and  provide  care  to  PWA  in  different clinical scenarios.Results: Overall  the  students  showed  unsatisfactory  know ledge  of universal  precaution  and  AIDS  pathophysiology  and  did  not  feel comfortable or prepared to care for PWA. The students did not also show  satisfactory  ethical  disposition  and  may  be  unwilling  to  care for PWA. The students’ knowledge levels on AIDS transmission and willingness were influenced by religious affiliation while feeling of comfort and ethical disposition were influenced by gender and knowing someone living with AIDS. They were more unwilling to provide whirlpool wound care procedures and chest physiotherapy compared to providing gait training, therapeutic exercise and activities of daily living training for PWA.Conclusion: The study identified the need to improve the curriculum on AIDS and recommends clinical clerkship and a methodical and sequential exposure of students to cases during clinical rotations.

Keywords

aids knowledge; affective traits; willingness; clinical scenarios

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