Original Research

The use of Xbox Kinect™ in a Paediatric Burns Unit

Eleonora I. Lozano, Joanne L. Potterton
South African Journal of Physiotherapy | Vol 74, No 1 | a429 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v74i1.429 | © 2018 Eleonora I. Lozano, Joanne L. Potterton | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 08 September 2017 | Published: 09 April 2018

About the author(s)

Eleonora I. Lozano, Department of Physiotherapy, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa; Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Johannesburg, South Africa
Joanne L. Potterton, Department of Physiotherapy, University of the Witwatersrand, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Background: The popularity of video game use in burns rehabilitation has grown because, in addition to facilitating maintenance of range of motion (ROM), the virtual imaging characteristics of these games provide distraction from pain.
Objectives: The effect of using Xbox Kinect™ as an adjunct to physiotherapy in a Paediatric Burns Unit (PBU) has not been established. This study aimed to investigate the effect of using the Xbox Kinect™ on outcomes of children in the PBU at Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital.
Methods: This non-equivalent, post-test only control group study took place over a period of 14 months. The control group received standard physiotherapy management and the experimental group received standard physiotherapy management and additional Xbox Kinect™. Outcome measures were ROM, Activities Scale for Kids (ASK©p) and a modified Wong-Baker FACES® enjoyment rating scale. Outcomes were assessed at discharge and then 1 week post-discharge at the usual follow-up appointment.
Results: Sixty-six children participated in this study. More than 50% of the burns were because of hot water, followed by flame burns (30%) and electrical burns (12%). The addition of Xbox Kinect™ was effective in achieving higher active ROM (AROM) between discharge and follow-up (p < 0.01). Fun and enjoyment (p < 0.01) was found to be significantly higher in the children who participated in Xbox Kinect™. Total body surface area (TBSA%) (p = 0.03), age (p = 0.05) and AROM (p = 0.04) were significantly associated with ASK©p scores.
Conclusion: The use of the Xbox Kinect™ has been shown to be a beneficial and useful adjunct to burns rehabilitation in this paediatric burns population.
Clinical implications: Currently, there is limited information and research on interventions for children with burns in South Africa. The addition of Xbox Kinect™ to standard physiotherapy in-patient care was both enjoyable and effective and should be considered where funding is available.

Keywords

Paediatric burns rehabilitation; video game technology; Kinect rehabilitation

Metrics

Total abstract views: 198
Total article views: 126


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.