Original Research

Happiness among South African private sector physiotherapists

Michael Elliot, Margaret Cullen, Andre Calitz
South African Journal of Physiotherapy | Vol 74, No 1 | a421 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v74i1.421 | © 2018 Michael Elliot, Margaret Cullen, Andre Calitz | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 19 August 2017 | Published: 28 March 2018

About the author(s)

Michael Elliot, Business School, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa
Margaret Cullen, Business School, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa
Andre Calitz, Department of Computing Sciences, Nelson Mandela University, South Africa


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Abstract

Background: Happiness of people can affect their daily functioning and work performance. There is limited research assessing the happiness levels of various disciplines within the health care industry. This article is the first attempt to evaluate the happiness levels of private sector physiotherapists in South Africa.
Objectives: Research in happiness and physiotherapy studies are two research areas that are not associated with one another in a global perspective. The objective of this study was to assess the happiness levels of private sector physiotherapists in South Africa.
Methods: A hypothesised model was statistically tested using a quantitative questionnaire, which was completed online. The target population of this study were all private sector physiotherapists who are members of the South African Society of Physiotherapy. A total of 395 respondents participated in the study.
Results: This study confirmed that factors such as influence, social relations, life balance, optimism, work and leisure are all positively associated with the happiness levels of private sector physiotherapists in South Africa. These variables are recommended as key focus areas for physiotherapy practice owners to address, in order to positively affect the happiness levels of all people in their workplace.
Conclusion: The study concludes the following: if happiness becomes a priority, then owners of physiotherapy practices need to generate a workforce who are more productive, demonstrate greater collaboration with colleagues and patients, are more positively energised, are less absent and are more loyal to the practice.
Clinical Implications: The contribution of this study is that it highlights the importance of managing staff in private physiotherapy practices in a holistic manner.

Keywords

happiness; private physiotherapists; South Africa

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Crossref Citations

1. Self-efficacy and its relationship with satisfaction with life and happiness among university students
Yolande van Zyl, Manilall Dhurup
Journal of Psychology in Africa  vol: 28  issue: 5  first page: 389  year: 2018  
doi: 10.1080/14330237.2018.1528760