Original Research

Profile of physiotherapists working with soccer teams in South Africa

Matthews Selomo, Maria E. Cochrane, Muhammad A. Dawood
South African Journal of Physiotherapy | Vol 79, No 1 | a1920 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v79i1.1920 | © 2023 Matthews Selomo, Maria E. Cochrane, Muhammad A. Dawood | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 16 May 2023 | Published: 19 October 2023

About the author(s)

Matthews Selomo, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Care Sciences, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, South Africa
Maria E. Cochrane, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Care Sciences, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, South Africa
Muhammad A. Dawood, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Care Sciences, Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University, Pretoria, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Soccer is one of the fastest growing sports in South Africa and the number of physiotherapists working with soccer teams has increased significantly. Despite increased appointments, very little is known regarding the demographic, education and work profiles of these physiotherapists.

Objective: To determine the profiles of physiotherapists working with soccer teams in South Africa.

Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was used to collect data from physiotherapists employed with soccer teams. Physiotherapists who were employed on a part-time basis and not registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa and who did not give consent were excluded. A total of 38 physiotherapists working with soccer teams participated in our study. A questionnaire was circulated, and participants were given 4 months to complete and submit it.

Results: Results showed that participants had a mean age of 31.35 years and were employed for a mean time of 3.41 years. Most participants were African (89.48%) and worked with amateur soccer teams (52.63%). The education results indicated that 66.67% of participants held bachelor’s degrees. Postgraduate- and undergraduate education were used most frequently by participants to guide clinical decision-making. Job satisfaction was satisfactory, but they were not satisfied with their salaries.

Conclusion: Our study is the first to investigate the profiles of physiotherapists working with soccer teams in South Africa. Demographic, education and work profiles for physiotherapists working with soccer teams were compiled, and the lack of information regarding the profiles of these physiotherapists was identified.

Clinical implications: Extensive future research is needed to inform and train physiotherapists regarding the management of soccer teams.


Keywords

physiotherapy; profile; soccer; football; teams; education; South Africa

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

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