Original Research

Perceptions of students and educators regarding a once-off pre-clinical ICU simulation activity

Ronel Roos, Heleen van Aswegen, Daleen Casteleijn, Catherine H. Thurling
South African Journal of Physiotherapy | Vol 78, No 1 | a1830 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v78i1.1830 | © 2022 Ronel Roos, Heleen van Aswegen, Daleen Casteleijn, Catherine H. Thurling | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 29 July 2022 | Published: 21 November 2022

About the author(s)

Ronel Roos, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Heleen van Aswegen, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Daleen Casteleijn, Department of Occupational Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa
Catherine H. Thurling, Centre for Health Sciences Education, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Background: Physiotherapy skills such as suction and manual hyperinflation (MHI) are used to manage patients in intensive care. Performing these skills effectively and safely requires a level of expertise. It is unknown whether a once-off preclinical high-fidelity simulation activity incorporating these skills would translate to clinical practice inclusion.

Objectives: To determine students’ perceptions of a simulation-based education (SBE) activity and clinical educators’ opinions of students’ implementation of skills into practice.

Method: Our study consisted of two parts: a retrospective record review of students’ feedback with the Simulation Effectiveness Tool – Modified (SET-M) and the Simulation Laboratory Questionnaire. A nominal group technique (NGT) with clinical educators provided information on students’ skills implementation. Descriptive data analysis was undertaken.

Results: Six SBE sessions, lasting 3 hours each, with 49 students (n = 8–9 students per session) were undertaken. Students perceived the teaching activity positively. Five (33.33%) of 15 clinical educators participated in the NGT. Participants had a mean age of 35.8 (± 8.9) years, were qualified for 13.9 (± 8.9) years and had been supervising students for 7.8 (± 6.7) years. The clinical educators’ top five opinions regarding students’ implementation of the intensive care unit (ICU) skills were: handling skills improved, students had greater confidence performing these skills, students were more observant of a patient’s response to the skill being performed, students had better theoretical knowledge and students had more accurate recall for precautions.

Conclusion: Clinical educators reported a change in students’ clinical practice with regard to skills implementation.

Clinical implications: A once-off preclinical SBE activity influences students’ ICU practice.


Keywords

cardiopulmonary; clinical practice; high-fidelity; intensive care; physiotherapy; simulation-based education (SBE)

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