Original Research

A comparative sudy of two pressure relieving techniques on three different wheelchair cushions

C. Eksteen, P. Cilliers, A. Swanepoel, E. Vermaak, Q Trollip, T. Wilford, P. M. van Dyk
South African Journal of Physiotherapy | Vol 62, No 2 | a150 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v62i2.150 | © 2006 C. Eksteen, P. Cilliers, A. Swanepoel, E. Vermaak, Q Trollip, T. Wilford, P. M. van Dyk | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 08 January 2006 | Published: 18 February 2006

About the author(s)

C. Eksteen, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria, South Africa
P. Cilliers, Hermanus Magnetic Observatory, South Africa
A. Swanepoel, Department of Statistics, University of Pretoria, South Africa
E. Vermaak, Research Assistant, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria., South Africa
Q Trollip, Research Assistant, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria., South Africa
T. Wilford, Research Assistant, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria., South Africa
P. M. van Dyk, Research Assistant, Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria., South Africa

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Abstract

Introduction: Pressure relief done by a spinal cord
injured patient is of utmost importance in order to prevent pressure
sore formation. Some pressure-relieving techniques are described
in previous literature, but their effectivity has not yet been deter-
mined on different wheelchair cushions.

Null Hypothesis (H0): The null hypothesis (H0) stated for thi
study is that there is no difference in the effectivity of forward
leaning and forward leaning towards the left as pressure relieving
techniques for quadriplegic wheelchair users over the differen
wheelchair cushions.

Design: An analytical experimental study design using a convenient sample group of ten complete lesion quadriplegics (C6 to T1) was performed at the Physiotherapy Department,
University of Pretoria.

Method: Interface pressure (in mmHg) over the ischial tuberosities and upper thigh areas was measured using the
Talley Oxford Pressure Monitor MKII with a 12-way matrix cell system.

Results and Conclusion: The Friedman test for associated observations indicated statistically that the leaning  diagonally forward pressure relieving technique is more effective for all three wheelchair cushions used in this study.


Keywords

pressure relieving technique; pressure sore; quadriplegic; interface pressure; wheelchair cushion

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