Original Research

High levels of self-efficacy in patients with type 2 diabetes attending a tertiary level clinic

K. Mostert Wentzel, C. Nel, A.J. van Rooijen, J. Francis, G. Gibbs, K. Hacker, S. Gebert
South African Journal of Physiotherapy | Vol 64, No 3 | a108 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajp.v64i3.108 | © 2008 K. Mostert Wentzel, C. Nel, A.J. van Rooijen, J. Francis, G. Gibbs, K. Hacker, S. Gebert | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 07 January 2008 | Published: 08 January 2008

About the author(s)

K. Mostert Wentzel, Lecturers and students from the Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria, South Africa
C. Nel, Lecturers and students from the Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria, South Africa
A.J. van Rooijen, Lecturers and students from the Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria, South Africa
J. Francis, Lecturers and students from the Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria, South Africa
G. Gibbs, Lecturers and students from the Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria, South Africa
K. Hacker, Lecturers and students from the Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria, South Africa
S. Gebert, Lecturers and students from the Department of Physiotherapy, University of Pretoria, South Africa

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Abstract

Self-management is a vital element in the care of type 2diabetes patients.  In turn, self-efficacy plays a major role in patients’ self-management. Self-efficacy is the patient’s personal judgement of his/herconfidence in performing aspects of diabetes self-management.  This study investigated the level of self-efficacy of patients attending the Pretoria Academic Hospital Diabetes Clinic, in the light of high levels ofre-admission due to complications, suggesting low self-efficacy levels. Eighty type 2 diabetes patients, mean age of 59 years, completed thepublished IDEA LL baseline questionnaire, to establish a self-efficacyscore.  Relationships between self-efficacy and demographic factors wereinvestigated using the chi-square test. The mean self-efficacy level of thesample population is excellent (mean = 85.44%).A lthough self-reported self-efficacy levels are excellent, in comparison to the Sarkar study (2006) in which participants only scored “fair”, it is speculated that self-efficacy is not transferred to self-management behaviour in thispopulation.  Afrikaans and English speaking participants score significantly better than those from other language categories. There is a positive relationship between self-efficacy and level of education and employment status (tendedtowards significance with p values of 0.06 and 0.07 respectively). A lthough self-efficacy scores of clients at this tertiary level outpatient clinic are excellent, further research is necessary to quantify self-management strategies andto correlate these with self-efficacy levels.

Keywords

type 2 diabetes, self-efficacy; physiotherapy / physical therapy

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Crossref Citations

1. New Possibilities in Life with Type 2 Diabetes: Experiences from Participating in a Guided Self-Determination Programme in General Practice
Bjørg Karlsen, Bettina Rasmussen Bruun, Bjørg Oftedal
Nursing Research and Practice  vol: 2018  first page: 1  year: 2018  
doi: 10.1155/2018/6137628